Jun 302020
 

15.065 BF343 Phyllonorycter esperella. (Goeze, 1783). New to Ireland

Two things conspired, firstly I had to attend the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast on 9th October 2019 for a check-up. Secondly I had an increased interest in hornbeam after Eamonn O’Donnell had found what appeared to be the tentiform mines of Phyllonorycter tenerella in Dublin. It turned out that the avenue between the main car park and the main building at the Royal is lined with hornbeams. It did not take long to notice the gallery mines of Stigmella microtheriella and S. floslactella and then I saw the first distinctive upper surface tent mine of P. esperella.. and then another… none of the other similar mines (such as P. coryli on hazel) are found on hornbeam. I collected a couple of specimens and went for my appointment… slightly late. After the appointment I called into Musgrave Park (next to another hospital!) in the knowledge that there is a well-established hornbeam hedge around the small car park. On parking up I could actually see esperella mines from the car window…

The hornbeams around these two Belfast hospitals are obviously imported as established trees, the moths have arrived with them. Long established hornbeams in Botanic are so far devoid of esperella but it is likely that they will move out over the next few years. As for tenerella I have had no luck. Occupied mines which look like this species have turned out to be the polyphagous (and rather annoying) P. messaniella but I will keep looking.

Dave Allen.

 

Jun 222020
 

On 25 August 2017 I caught an unfamiliar species of micro-moth in my moth trap at Tramore, Co. Waterford (grid reference S577013). The specimen was identified as Etiella zinckenella using Moths of Europe Vol. 4. and is new to Ireland. John Langmaid of Hampshire confirmed the identification. The moth will be lodged with the National Museum of Ireland, Natural History, Dublin.
Resident in mainland Europe, North and Sub-Saharan Africa and flying from April to September, E. zinckenella occurs as a rare immigrant elsewhere, and as an adventive species, on imported legumes. The moth was first recorded from the British Isles at Bradwell-on-Sea, Essex on 23 October 1989. Although still an uncommon immigrant to these shores it has since occurred with more frequency. The origin of the Irish specimen would appear immigrant in nature as the days immediately before and after its capture coincided with the arrival of the scarce migrants Palpita vitrealis, Delicate Mythimna vitellina and White-speck Mythimna unipuncta.
Tony Bryant.
Bryant, T., 2017. Etiella zinckenella (Treitschke, 1832) (Lep.: Pyralidae) a migrant new to Ireland. The Entomologist’s Record and Journal of Variation 129: 225-226.

62.065 Ephestia woodiella – New to Ireland

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on 62.065 Ephestia woodiella – New to Ireland
Jun 172020
 

On 24 May 2017 I caught an unfamiliar species in a light trap at Tramore, Co. Waterford (grid reference S577013). I tentatively identified it using British Pyralid Moths and Moths of Europe Vol.4. as Ephestia woodiella. The moth was subsequently dissected and confirmed by Ken Bond as a male of the species and new to Ireland. The specimen will be lodged with the National Museum of Ireland, Natural History, Dublin.

In Britain it is reported to fly from May to September. Unlike other British members of the genus, it is not a pest of warehouses and is encountered outdoors, having been beaten from ivy, yew and alder and it also comes to light. The larva is suspected to feed on dried plant material, dried berries and the dead stems of ivy. Recorded from England, Wales and the Channel Islands, it is widely distributed across much of central Western Europe.

Tony Bryant and Ken Bond.

Bryant, T. & Bond K.G.M., 2017. Ephestia woodiella Richards & Thomson, 1932 (Lep.: Pyralidae) new to Ireland. The Entomologist’s Record and Journal of Variation 129: 230.

73.180 Barred Sallow, Tiliacea aurago – New to Ireland

 New to Ireland  Comments Off on 73.180 Barred Sallow, Tiliacea aurago – New to Ireland
Jun 012020
 

73.180 Barred Sallow Tiliacea aurago

On the morning of 11th October 2018 I (CM) inspected the moth trap as usual in my small suburban garden in Priory Park, Belfast. I deploy a Robinson trap with 125W MV bulb, which is set out on tarmac in front of the garden shed, where it is positioned to have least impact on neighbouring houses.
As I removed the lid I immediately noticed a sallow-type moth, which looked different to the pink-barred sallow Xanthia togata which is regular in the garden in small numbers. On consulting my copy of Waring and Townsend, I quickly confirmed that the moth was a barred sallow Tiliacea aurago. I subsequently found a second specimen within the trap, and having taken some photographs, I retained both specimens for further inspection.
I posted the photographs on the MothsIreland and Butterfly Conservation NI Facebook pages and it was confirmed that the species was new to Ireland.
The night of 10th/11th October was particularly warm for the time of year with a minimum temperature of 14.8C. My catch that night was otherwise typical of the time of year and included resident species such as Merveille du Jour (Moma alpium), Feathered Thorn (Colotois pennaria), Black Rustic (Aporophyla nigra) and Red-green Carpet (Chloroclysta siterata).
Barred sallow larvae feed on Beech Fagus sp. or Field Maple Acer campestre. Although neither occur in the neighbouring gardens, both species are thought to occur within Balmoral Golf Club which is across a road from the garden trap.
Having seen the moths which CM had taken, Ted Rolston (TR) decided to set out a moth trap in his garden on the night of October 12th, a few miles away at Beechdene Gardens, Lisburn. In the trap were six fresh barred sallow along with several pink-barred sallow which were rather faded in comparison. Following this, TR took a single specimen of the moth on October 15th, seven on October 20th and two on November 5th. No further specimens were taken by CM in his Priory Park garden.
The Barred Sallow appears to be spreading northwards from its original stronghold in south-eastern England and was also recorded in Scotland for the first time recently (Argyllshire 2017). Since the food plants are widespread across much of Ireland, it will be of interest to see whether the species is recorded from a wider area in autumn 2019 and beyond.

Clive Mellon and Ted Rolston