4.074 Etainia sericopeza (Zeller, 1839) – New to Ireland

 Leaf Mine, New to Ireland, Rare moth sightings  Comments Off on 4.074 Etainia sericopeza (Zeller, 1839) – New to Ireland
Oct 122022
 

Thanks to a small grant from CEDaR Environmental Recorders Group I was to spend a bit more time than usual looking at leaf mines in Northern Ireland. One of my search areas, which I have rarely visited, was Ormeau Park, Belfast (Co Down) not very distant, but an area with many mature trees and a good under-storey.

A gentle stroll into the park on 22nd July 2022 quickly revealed a number of common species on beech and hazel. A mature Norway maple (Acer platanoides) then drew my attention. In Ireland I have been looking in vain for “samara miners” for over six years. I have seen two species with ease in France so my eye is “in”.  A number of samaras were on the ground, I was totally flabbergasted to immediately find two mined samaras. The mines were of Etainia sericopeza (field maple and sycamore have different miners).

The egg is laid on the wing of the samara, the larva then mines a thin gallery towards and into the seed. Depending on the age of the samara the mines can be obvious or more cryptic.

On 23rd July I could not believe my luck in finding another mined samara, this time at Shaw’s Bridge, Belfast (Co Antrim).

Dave Allen July 2022

4.057 Stigmella suberivora (Stainton, 1869) New to Ireland

 General interest, Leaf Mine, New to Ireland, Rare sightings  Comments Off on 4.057 Stigmella suberivora (Stainton, 1869) New to Ireland
Aug 162022
 

Thanks to a small grant from National Parks and Wildlife Service I was able to survey leaf mining Lepidoptera in the Republic of Ireland. Although my focus was on the border counties where leaf miners are seriously under recorded I kept the brief broad. This allowed me to travel to Meath and Dublin where I teamed up with my old friend Eamonn O’Donnell and his partner Kerri Gorentz. One of our search areas was to be the Botanic Gardens and Cemetery at Glasnevin, Co Dublin. These places are usually good for leaf miners with an array of exotic, non-native trees and shrubs. I was also well aware of the recent discovery of Ectoedemia heringella on evergreen oaks Quercus ilex at the Botanic Gardens.

E. heringella was easily found in both the Gardens and cemetery. Typically, it is already abundant with multiple mines on many leaves. I knew from looking at leaf mines in France and London that another species could also occur on these trees, S. suberivora, but that finding it has become much harder because of the density of heringella mines which can obscure it.

After about fifteen minutes of searching I found what I believed to be two mines of suberivora. Both were on leaves lacking heringella mines. The heringella mines are small ad compact taking up on average less than a square cm whereas the two suberivora mines were long (just over 4cm) and along the leaf margin. Mines of both were packed with black frass and egg upper in both cases. Without backlighting the mines are buffish in colour. As heringella increases in numbers, which it will, then suberivora is likely to become increasingly difficult to locate. A number of UK experts concurred with the identification.

Mines of E. heringella

 

Mine of S. suberivora (backlit)

 

The same mine without backlighting

Dave Allen July 2022

15.0931 Phyllocnistis citrella – New to Ireland

 Leaf Mine, New to Ireland  Comments Off on 15.0931 Phyllocnistis citrella – New to Ireland
Jul 212020
 

On 24th January I was in Sainsbury’s at Forestside, Belfast, Co. Down doing the weekly shop. I was well aware that oranges and lemons with leaves in GB supermarkets had been producing mines of the “snail trail” leaf mining micromoth Phyllocnistis citrella. I had searched in previous years without success. On a recent trip to Lanzarote I had found fresh mines on a lemon tree in Manrique’s garden so I was well tuned-in! My eyes were drawn to boxes of “Taste the Difference” easy-peel oranges as I could see that the fruit had sprays of leaves attached. I opened the first box and was somewhat amazed to see mines on the first leaves. In fact most boxes had the leaf mines. The mines are only in the leaf epidermis and on close inspection a thin line of black frass is visible. Fresh mines are white in appearance but after being vacated they quickly turn brown.

The oranges had been imported from Spain where this species can occur in pest proportions. Surprisingly there are no previous records of this adventive but having been alerted Ted Rolston and Andy Crory found mined leaves (and fruit) on oranges in a number of other outlets. Christmas is apparently the best time to look so you might find a welcome Xmas present if you look hard enough.

Dave Allen

4.088 Ectoedemia heringella – New to Ireland

 Leaf Mine, New to Ireland  Comments Off on 4.088 Ectoedemia heringella – New to Ireland
Jul 022020
 

4.088 BF36a. Ectoedemia heringella (Mariani, 1939)

On 5th May 2020 Jamie O’Neill posted images on Insects & Invertebrates Ireland Facebook page of an abundant leaf miner that he found on Evergreen Oak in Phoenix Park, Dublin. He putatively identified them as E. heringella. This was quickly confirmed by Stuart Dunlop and Dave Allen (DA) who also confirmed it, after consultation with Ken Bond, as “New to Ireland”. A few weeks later Philip Strickland contacted DA with images of the same species from the same locality but taken on 13th February 2017! The mines are persistent so can be found in any month of the year. The species has obviously been established here for a number of years but remained undetected. If it follows the same pattern as in GB, where it was first found close to Kew Gardens in London, then it will certainly colonise other parts of Ireland.

Horse Chestnut Leaf-miner Cameraria ohridella present in Ireland

 Leaf Mine, New to Ireland  Comments Off on Horse Chestnut Leaf-miner Cameraria ohridella present in Ireland
Aug 032014
 

Cameraria ohridella was first confirmed in Ireland in south Dublin during 2013. In recent weeks, (June & July 2014) as well as throughout Dublin, mines and adults have been noticed in Belfast, Cavan, Louth and Wicklow and while many searches of trees have been negative it is likely to be more widespread than the current distribution map indicates.

As I write this the 2 maps above are the same. The map on left will stay fixed as a snapshot of what is known on 1st Aug 2014, the right map will update when further sightings are confirmed.

We would like you to look for mines of this species in your area on Horse Chestnut trees (Conker Tree) While fresh mines are distinctive, the old mines are brown as is leaf blotch, a fungal disease which can be found, sometimes very extensively on practically all Horse Chestnut trees. For the inexperienced this blotch can be easily interpreted as mines. If in doubt it is probably blotch

If you feel you have a definite sighting of a mine, forward a photo via Ask an Expert
If we can confirm we will add your sighting to the map.

The following 3 photos, courtesy of Dave Allen indicate of what to look out for. the fresh mines are pale and obvious. Part of the mine is usually a darker blotch and frass and a caterpillar may be visible. The mines may join together and many caterpillars may be visible together. The most likely location on tree is low, usually within reach and often near the trunk. The caterpillar pupates inside the mine. The 2nd photo shows an exit case. These are often seen sticking out of the leaf. If it has fallen out then a hole is left. The 3rd photo shows many mines in a leaf.

Further information

Ukmoths
British Leafminers

Cameraria ohridella has a very recent history having been first observed in Macedonia in 1984. It was first observed in Britain in 2002
See wikipedia for more info

 Posted by at 17:28